commercial printers

5 Fonts to Avoid in the Corporate World

The corporate world is all about professionalism beginning from your attire to the fonts you use. In order to be heard and taken seriously, there are set rules and guideline one ought to follow in order to fit into the demands of the corporate world.  As one’s knowledge, skill and ability to perform is of high importance sending out of a legal document both traditional and electronic with the wrong font which looks similar to that of a teenagers choice would completely throw you off your game.

Why is your choice of font of such great importance? Each font during the time of designing was done with a purpose to suit its specificity portraying elegance, respect, tradition or simplicity and these aspects set the unheard tone of the message you are trying to send across.

With the rise in commercial printers appearing everywhere and the demand for their services, there is a lack of experience and knowledge as to these requirements. Us, being in the rush we are constantly at refuse to take the time to understand the seriousness of these basic requirements hence, we go with the most convenient choice of allowing the job to get done rather than the focus being quality.

Here are the top 5 fonts to avoid in the Corporate World

1. Comic Sans

The Comic sans designed by Vincent Connare in 1994. Why don’t you take a wild guess of the inspiration behind the designing of the font? Well, a comic book! This should be all the reason for one to never turn to Comic sans when it comes to the corporate world. It simply sets a casual mode which lacks professionalism and I’m sure that not the message we want to be sending around in our offices.

2. Trajan 

This font is a serif typeface designed by  Carol Twombly in 1989 for Adobe. The designs received their inspiration from the Trajan columns of Rome and I’m sure the name of the font makes better sense. It is a font used in uppercase. Why would you want to send out an email or a legal document in uppercase unless you are making a professional attempt to make a particular emphasis or there appears to be a technical error on your keyboard? The Trajan font is a big ‘no-no’.

3. Arial

This font although known for its simplicity lacks a sense of originality. As it is a default font set in various applications it is often used and mostly by amateur professionals who do not take the time to pick a more sophisticated font. We could go into the details of height and width and the influence when reading but check it out for yourself! Try using a font that states professionalism and go back, you will notice the difference.

4. Bradley Hand

It is similar to that of a handwritten font and is only recommended to be used when you are looking at adding a personal touch to your work. Since the font is readily available and one is simply bored at the office you tend to opt for this. It’s another big ‘no-no’. Assume presenting your work on a big screen to the bosses. All that hard work tossed off by choosing the wrong font is simply something that ought to be avoided. Any font that is similar to handwritten fonts should be avoided.

5. Courier New 

Though this font seems to add a bit of tradition to printed documents and it has an uncanny resemblance to the font used in a typewriter, the use of this font would make your document look like it has been pulled out from the archives unless that’s the message you want to send across. If Courier new is on your list of recently used fonts strike it off.

It’s time yo let these fonts go! The fonts with twirls and curls, creative round bubbled edges and those that remove the formality and authority from your work should be avoided.

In times of doubt and uncertainty as to what would pass and what wouldn’t, a suggestion would be to leave it to the experts and allow them to make the decision in choice of fonts for your legal documents and you would never send out a wrong message again.

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